Being A Fantasy Reader

In this guest post author and book lover, Claire Buss discusses being a reader of fantasy.

Today is World Book Night. A perfect excuse to spend the evening curled up with your favourite book which is an easy ask for a book lover but what World Book Day really wants to do is encourage non-readers to pick up a book and have an adventure. That’s the great thing about reading, it will take you somewhere you’ve never been before or if you’re lucky, take you back to explore it all over again. Often readers of fantasy get a bit of bad rap – there can be mocking and sometimes you don’t want to admit that you read sci-fi & fantasy because it puts you in a pre-determined box but on this day of book celebration I think we can stand loud and proud and shout to the stars that we read fantasy and it’s brilliant.

Or to put it another way – isn’t all fiction fantasy? Because it’s fiction therefore it’s not ‘real’. When you read that chick-lit novel about girls doing lunch and talking about their love lives you may sit wistfully wishing you could be a lady wot lunches. It’s no different to me wishing I could go on a quest in a magical land. My imagination just requires a little more immersion, perhaps.

It can be difficult for an avid reader to entice a non-reader to pick up a book, especially when you stumble over the intricate plot twists of sorcery and sword fights. But think about the books that brought you into the genre – I mean I can go as far back as The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton, talking animals in Farthing Wood by Colin Dann and The Worst Witch by Jill Murphy. These aren’t hard-core fantasy tomes. They’re magical children’s books and what a great way to get kids reading by giving them a little bit of adventure. I mean, Harry Potter wouldn’t have been the sensation it’s been without the reader’s ability to immerse themselves in an alternate reality.

Not only am I an avid reader – of all genres but with a particular liking for fantasy & sci-fi – I am also an author. My book is hard to define, it doesn’t really set within a predetermined category. It’s listed under sci-fi because it’s set 200 years in the future but there are no aliens or spaceships. It’s dystopian because there has been a mass extinction event, we learn how humanity coped, adapted and now tries to break free of control. But it’s hopeful and in general dystopian novels are bleak and literally end of the world. And it’s not about a plucky group of teenagers. Instead it looks at the relationships of couples and how they cope with massive life changes. Being a new author it’s hard to get readers at first so you turn to friends and family, most of whom said “Oh I don’t read Sci-Fi”, however once I convince them that The Gaia Effect is not hard-boiled sci-fi, they should try it, they might be surprise and look, it’s such a lovely slimline novel with great cover artwork – how can you say no? Then they read it and text me, telling me off for making them cry. Success! All reviews from family and friends start with the phrase ‘This is not my usual genre’ or ‘I don’t normally read Sci-Fi but…’ and I think that’s the key, if you can just get a non-reader to try something new they might be surprised.

Let’s not forget that genre is an invention of the publisher to make it easier to categorise books and not a request from the reader. I don’t think about genre when I recommend books to friends and family, I think about them and choose books to fit, overriding any objections of ‘I don’t read that genre’ with reminders of all the previous excellent recommendations.  Once we’ve managed to get sporadic readers picking up our novel and getting to the end, our next challenge is to ask them to write a review – even a simple star rating is enough, every little helps.

Find out more about Claire and her book on the following links –

Website: www.cbvisions.weeblycom

Facebook: www.facebook.com/busswriter

 

Are you an author and want to spread the word about your book or writing habits? Get in touch with me at matthewolney9@gmail.com
Alternatively get in touch via Facebook and Twitter and please sign up to the newsletter

 

Save

Save

Save

Advertisements

One thought on “Being A Fantasy Reader

  1. Great article, and so true.
    There’s only one thing I don’t agree with: readers do care about genre. They might be persuaded for different reasons to read the odd novel that doesn’t fall into their comfort zone, but normally they seek book by genre. We all do that, not necessarily because of marketing, but because we have inclinations, some stories resonate with us more than others.

    Unfortunately, market had brought this natural inclination to a crazy specialization. Books are so specifically characterised today, and the ‘readers who read this might also like that’ attitude is so common, that even readers are influenced by it. It takes a very independent-thinking reader to not fall into this trick. And unfortunatelly, the market doesn’t encourage independent thinking.

    This is what International Book Day should be for me: getting readers to think what they really like, beyond what the market have them think they should like 🙂

    Thanks for a great post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s